Some say Kansas insurance regulators to blame for natural birth center closing in KCK

Some say Kansas insurance regulators to blame for natural birth center closing in KCK


A natural birth center is closing in Kansas City, Kansas. Supporters blame Kansas insurance regulators and their policies for the closure.A birthing room at the New Birth Company has a bed for delivery or a bathtub or a very traditional method.”All women over millennia had a very long piece of fabric. They would put it over the beam in the house or the barn and they would use that as counter pressure,” said Kendra Wyatt, CEO at the New Birth Company.Renee Pierson’s son, Beniah, was born at the KCK center. Her first child was born at a hospital.”But one was very traumatic, and one was very free and empowering. I just hope more people get the experience to have that here,” Pierson said.The owners say Kansas insurance regulations forced them to close.The problem with this is at the federal level, the payments are 100% but in Kansas, they are not.Supporters said that the $1,295 Kansas pays has not changed in 10 years and in some cases, Kansas does not recognize natural birth centers as health care providers.”Not having both of those at the same time is almost near to impossible to navigate,” Wyatt said.This spring, the nonpartisan Aspen Institute wrote that the conventional medical approach to birth is flawed.Owners of the New Birth Company believe Kansas insurance regulators tilt away from these businesses, too.KMBC’s Micheal Mahoney reported that the company’s news conference Monday may start the push to change how Kansas regulators view and reimburse natural birth centers.The firm also has another natural birth center in Overland Park, which is still open.

A natural birth center is closing in Kansas City, Kansas. Supporters blame Kansas insurance regulators and their policies for the closure.

A birthing room at the New Birth Company has a bed for delivery or a bathtub or a very traditional method.

“All women over millennia had a very long piece of fabric. They would put it over the beam in the house or the barn and they would use that as counter pressure,” said Kendra Wyatt, CEO at the New Birth Company.

Renee Pierson’s son, Beniah, was born at the KCK center. Her first child was born at a hospital.

“But one was very traumatic, and one was very free and empowering. I just hope more people get the experience to have that here,” Pierson said.

The owners say Kansas insurance regulations forced them to close.

The problem with this is at the federal level, the payments are 100% but in Kansas, they are not.

Supporters said that the $1,295 Kansas pays has not changed in 10 years and in some cases, Kansas does not recognize natural birth centers as health care providers.

“Not having both of those at the same time is almost near to impossible to navigate,” Wyatt said.

This spring, the nonpartisan Aspen Institute wrote that the conventional medical approach to birth is flawed.

Owners of the New Birth Company believe Kansas insurance regulators tilt away from these businesses, too.

KMBC’s Micheal Mahoney reported that the company’s news conference Monday may start the push to change how Kansas regulators view and reimburse natural birth centers.

The firm also has another natural birth center in Overland Park, which is still open.


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