‘Be safe so other people can do this’

‘Be safe so other people can do this’

Families are beginning to reconnect after spending a year apart during the pandemic. Many are erring on the side of caution to minimize COVID-19 risk for their older adult relatives.Sister station KCRA-TV met with two families about their first post-vaccination visits with loved ones.Following vaccinations, negative coronavirus tests and the go-ahead from a California care facility, Paul Klein, Fred Emigh and Fred’s 101-year-old mom, Mary, reunited this week and appreciated every minute of their in-person visit.Klein captured the moment, exactly one year in the making, on his cellphone video camera.”I just knew this was going to be a special moment,” Klein said. “Just being able to get in that building and hold on to her for a few seconds was the most precious thing I could ask for.”The video shows an outpouring of emotion among the family members as they made up for 52 weeks worth of not being able to visit with each other except for through the windows of the care facility where Mary lives.”We’d do a little virtual hug and put our hand up to the glass doors and we’d touch her through the glass doors,” explained Emigh. “To be as close to her as we could.”Pandemic-era visits with loved ones, however, just aren’t what most of us will ever get used to, especially for families accustomed to showing their love through an embrace.”Mary is a real hugger,” Klein said. “She loves to hug or just sit there, and hold her hand.”The chance to do that once again, with no window between them, finally came at long last.”After not being able to hug her for an entire year…” Klein said. “I was not going to let that moment pass.”Meeting in-person was exactly what this family needed.The same is true for the Ortman and Masley families. Barbara and Jim Ortman were thrilled to see their granddaughters after a full year.”It was just wonderful! Just the biggest, gigantic hugs from both of the girls,” said Barbara Ortman. “It was so wonderful just to all be together like old days again and old times.”The Ortman’s daughter, Crystal Masley is a family physician. She knew the risks COVID-19 poses, so she heeded the advice she gave her patients. The family waited until it was safe.”Once we were fully vaccinated, and then the new CDC guidelines came out last weekend, we were definitely ready to embrace those and know that it was safe to get together again,” Masley said.Real-life reunions are now possible for them.”I just really encourage everyone when your chance is up to get the vaccine,” Masley said. “I think it is what we all need to do to get back to whatever the new normal is.””Be safe so other people can do this also,” encouraged Emigh.

Families are beginning to reconnect after spending a year apart during the pandemic. Many are erring on the side of caution to minimize COVID-19 risk for their older adult relatives.

Sister station KCRA-TV met with two families about their first post-vaccination visits with loved ones.

Following vaccinations, negative coronavirus tests and the go-ahead from a California care facility, Paul Klein, Fred Emigh and Fred’s 101-year-old mom, Mary, reunited this week and appreciated every minute of their in-person visit.

Klein captured the moment, exactly one year in the making, on his cellphone video camera.

“I just knew this was going to be a special moment,” Klein said. “Just being able to get in that building and hold on to her for a few seconds was the most precious thing I could ask for.”

The video shows an outpouring of emotion among the family members as they made up for 52 weeks worth of not being able to visit with each other except for through the windows of the care facility where Mary lives.

Paul Klein

Fred Emigh and Paul Klein visit mom, Mary, at her care center during the COVID-19 pandemic

“We’d do a little virtual hug and put our hand up to the glass doors and we’d touch her through the glass doors,” explained Emigh. “To be as close to her as we could.”

Pandemic-era visits with loved ones, however, just aren’t what most of us will ever get used to, especially for families accustomed to showing their love through an embrace.

“Mary is a real hugger,” Klein said. “She loves to hug or just sit there, and hold her hand.”

The chance to do that once again, with no window between them, finally came at long last.

Long-overdue visits with loved ones post-vaccinations

Paul Klein

First post-vaccination visit with mom. Fred Emigh and Paul Klein visit with Fred’s mom, Mary

“After not being able to hug her for an entire year…” Klein said. “I was not going to let that moment pass.”

Meeting in-person was exactly what this family needed.

The same is true for the Ortman and Masley families. Barbara and Jim Ortman were thrilled to see their granddaughters after a full year.

“It was just wonderful! Just the biggest, gigantic hugs from both of the girls,” said Barbara Ortman. “It was so wonderful just to all be together like old days again and old times.”

Grandparents finally see children, grandchildren after a year apart

Crystal Ortman Masley

Grandparents reunite with children, grandchildren following pandemic

The Ortman’s daughter, Crystal Masley is a family physician. She knew the risks COVID-19 poses, so she heeded the advice she gave her patients. The family waited until it was safe.

“Once we were fully vaccinated, and then the new CDC guidelines came out last weekend, we were definitely ready to embrace those and know that it was safe to get together again,” Masley said.

Real-life reunions are now possible for them.

“I just really encourage everyone when your chance is up to get the vaccine,” Masley said. “I think it is what we all need to do to get back to whatever the new normal is.”

“Be safe so other people can do this also,” encouraged Emigh.


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